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December 29, 2009
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Based on Microsoft XP SP3 Professional operating system. Standard features include IE 8 browser with SUN and Microsoft JVM, Macromedia Flash, Adobe Acrobat Reader. Windowing support for all applications, built-in Terminal Emulation, and device support for printers, USB and PCMCIA. Connection to Citrix or Terminal Server, Windows Domain servers provided -- all displayed on a Windows XP desktop.
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December 29, 2009
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Based on Microsoft XP SP3 Professional operating system. Standard features include IE 8 browser with both SUN and Microsoft JVM, Macromedia Flash, Adobe Acrobat Reader. Windowing support for all applications, built-in Terminal Emulation, and device support for printers, USB and PCMCIA. Connection to Citrix or Terminal Server, Windows Domain servers provided -- all displayed on a Windows XP SP3 desktop.
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December 29, 2009
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There are many benefits to switching from PCs to thin clients. One of the benefits is the effect to our environment. Research has found that PCs use twice as much energy as a thin client environment. PCs average between 65 – 250 watts of energy whereas thin clients require only about 40 watts including the server.
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December 29, 2009
In the beginning, thin-client terminals booted from a server, had very slow CPUs with small amounts of memory, and relied on application servers to provide needed features. It is no surprise that these early thin clients didn't take off because delivery was poor (high bandwidth requirements, low color support, no sound, etc.) and the application...
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December 29, 2009
Ever since Thin Clients were conceived the message has always been that unlike PC’s the CPU on the Thin Client is unimportant. The concept this comes from is that the Server is doing most of the work and therefore the horsepower needs to be there. The Thin Client in this case is merely animating the screen content and sending the keyboard and mouse data to the Server. What we have seen...
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December 29, 2009
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When thin clients first appeared on the market over 10 years ago, IBM was a great proponent of this technology even though the first units had slow CPUs, limited memory, and Linux-based operating systems. In the early days of thin clients, networks were still employing hubs instead of switches. Hubs share all network traffic with all the attached devices; therefore, this type of technology did not work well...
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December 29, 2009
Now is the time for virtual desktops.  There are a lot of people in the industry saying that you should wait. We ask why?  There are serious savings in support and energy costs to be garnered along with significant other factors that will increase agility and lower TCO.  Don't wait.  If you follow the advice and steps outlined below, and build a solid business case, you will be successful.
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December 29, 2009
Is your organization looking to break-away from the old ways of deploying desktops?  If so, how do you validate that a new approach is better, more efficient and overcomes past challenges? The answer: a Proof-of-Concept.  This is the way to prove out the technology, gather intelligence about your user base, application usage, and network.  It will require you to define requirements for success, those specific requirements will, of course, be different...
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December 27, 2009
For many years corporate America has been looking for ways to reduce the cost of ownership associated with Microsoft Windows®-based computing. The popularity of Windows-based Thin Clients coupled with deployment of Terminal Server and Citrix has been growing at a rapid rate. Over the years a new trend has been developing; enterprises are now trying to reduce costs further by moving to “intelligent” Thin Clients.
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December 27, 2009
The PC desktop has inherent drawbacks in the areas of manageability, security, and resources that the virtual desktop impressively addresses. Desktop virtualization is quickly gaining traction. It's no wonder given the high cost of maintaining PCs and the popularity of client-server technology. Costs can vary, but one study by a leading industry research group states that the total cost of ownership for a desktop PC is about $5,400 per PC, per...
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